Windy City Doll Workshops
September 27-30, 2018          
HomeAbout UsIn MemoryMeet our TeachersInez Brasch - Roxie and Velma Dawn Schiller  -  the Wolfman
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Meet Our Teachers
  
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Dawn Schiller (Dee) is a self-taught artist who is always 
learning and experimenting.    She is the author of the new book,
 "FaeMaker"  Making Character Figures with Polymer Clay" 
from Impact Books.

Her award-winning work is internationally collected and has
 appeared in shows, galleries, books, and magazines, in both the
 US and Europe. Dawn exhibits yearly at Comic Con International
 in San Diego, and at other pop culture/media related shows
 around the US.

                        A self-employed sculptor full-time for fifteen years, Dawn has been teaching                           online and in-person for seven years. She has recently begun sculpting in 
                        leather and fiber in addition to her work with various types of clay.

                        Dawn collects Halloween socks, interesting hats and loves 
Faerie, Halloween and geekdom. A full-time self employed fine artist/sculptor, 
she lives in Southern California in a cluttered condo with husband/science
 teacher/fencer/coach Greg, four kittykids, a tarantula, a gecko, a turtle and
 any other critters Greg’s students happen to find wandering loose.

Dee has sculpted, made dolls or drawn since she was a little kid in the rural 
Midwest (there really are faeries in the Woods)...she’s an artist because she 
can’t imagine being or doing anything else — it’s BIG FUN!!! A loft studio,
 affectionately referred to as “The Lair”, is where the oddfae come to life. Greg doesn’t like to                                 go up there because there’s always someone (or something) staring at him.

                      Her creepy, strange and lunatic creations — treefolk and witches, merfolk 
                    and wizards, werewolves, fugitives from fairy tales, Figments of the Imagination,                        and the slightly-off-center — Odd Fae and Autumn Things, can be found online at                             www.oddfae.com.
Dawn Schiller

Inez Brasch                     
Gayle Wray
There will be a limited amount of places
 in Galye's classroom of only 10 students
Renowned for her textile-sculpted art dolls; Gayle continues to break new ground,
implementing realistic poseability and unique design in her vintage, couture inspired art dolls. Her work has been on display in art museums and publications such as Art Doll Quarterly. 

                               As a cross-over artist, she's won awards in the fine art world, 
     for her cloth art doll creations.    Her dolls 
       each capture a mood and tell unique a story. 

Learn her secret techniques for:
*developing an expressive face

*never before seen finishing methods 
*and poseability that create drama,
 in the old Hollywood style, we all love 

   Inez came into doll making from a Fine Art/Commercial Art 
background where she worked for many years. On a whim, she 
and another artist friend thought it might be fun to do dolls. 
They tried it and both were hooked.

                                        They began with porcelain but after a couple of years decided it was                                               just too much work and besides, they hated doing multiples of anything.                                           So they turned to polymer clay and air drying clay and doing one of a                                               kind creations. The friend decided she liked best working in low fire red                                         clay that she’d used in her artwork for years. Inez decided she liked the                                         polymer and air dry clays but would also like to try cloth. She still works                                         in all three mediums.

                                       Her work has won awards both nationally and internationally and has been   featured in magazines and books, has been shown in art galleries in San                                            Francisco, Santa Fe, Columbus, Cleveland and Cincinnati and has been                                                collected throughout the United States.

  She herself collects art work of many kinds, among which are art dolls,                                           antique dolls and antique bears.

 She lives in Columbus, Ohio with her scientist husband, Jim, and her very                                        helpful son, Marc. 
The three of them are owned by two very demanding cats:  Sasha and Pearl.

Artist’s Statement:
I love being an artist. In painting, I love being able to reproduce a scene and make it personal with color choice and by eliminating something I don’t like or repositioning something to a more visually pleasing spot. In sculpting, I love being able to take a mental image and reproduce it in the round.

Whether it’s a painting or a sculpture, I prefer working small. That’s why mostof my art dolls are 14” or smaller. My favorite sculpting medium is air drying clay because of its finish and the way it accepts paint. But I also think dolls with little or no clothing need to be done in cloth because cloth better replicates skin rather than a hard surface with visible stringed joints.

                                            To me, art is all about emotion. I believe that it isn’t enough to                                                          understand and manipulate a medium well, if the end result doesn’t                                                  evoke a response in the viewer. And it doesn’t matter what that                                                      response is. It can be love or hate, laughter or tears so long as it’s                                                  not indifference. So, whenever I create I try hard to suggest a story                                              that the viewer completes for himself. If my work engages someone                                                else’s imagination or makes him laugh, I consider it a success.